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Beirut duo Three Machine keep the Fantome de Nuit presses hot as they go in with their 'Abandon Ship EP'. Lebanese producers Tarek Majdalani and Sleiman Damien, aka Three Machines, are two musical heavyweights who credit their coming together to "normal conditions, through business arrangements and mutual acquaintances". Listeners of their upcoming Abandon Ship EP may find that quite hard to believe, shifting the blame of their first encounter onto much darker forces. The duo has surgically generated an intricately layered but elegant wall of sound that that feels right at home in obscure basements and colossal open spaces alike. That wall of sound approach is apparent from the first few moments of the opening track, Abandon Ship. An incredibly warm mover, Abandon Ship steadily builds into a majestic web of nuanced tones and striking textures. Majdalani and Damien layer their signature percussion over spaced out pads and a melodic bass line. The result is something that leaves the listener feeling like they've just visited an exotic beach... on another planet. The B side, If Only I could, is a deep, slower paced grower. Tinged with funk influenced percussion and a brooding back piano riff, the track drives the listener into a state of meditative melancholy. By the time the track breaks, the rhythm has become infectious and you find yourself waiting for the looped piano line amidst the lush and deep harmonies. By the time it's over you're sure to find yourself giving it a rewind. Label boss Technophile steps up to give the A side his signature treatment. He chooses to bulk the track up with a weighty, pounding bass line and strips back the original's elaborate percussion in favour of complex glitches and bleeps. The remix has a heavier feel, as Technophile swaps the spacey pads out for shades of acid and robotic rhythms. This one is for the darkest hours of night and will surely be heard on the scene's biggest dance floors.
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